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“Statistics to English Translation”

The core of our “statistics to English translation” series is Nina Zumel’s sequence of articles: “I don’t think that means what you think it means;” Statistics to English Translation, Part 1: Accuracy Measures Statistics to English Translation, Part 2a: ’Significant’ Doesn’t Always Mean ’Important’ Statistics to English Translation, Part 2b: […]

On The Decomposition of Variance

I am conducting another machine learning / AI bootcamp this week. Starting one of these always makes me want to get more statistical commentaries down, just in case I need one. These classes have to move fast, and also move correctly. In this case I want to write about decomposition […]

Unrolling the ROC

In our data science teaching, we present the ROC plot (and the area under the curve of the plot, or AUC) as a useful tool for evaluating score-based classifier models, as well as for comparing multiple such models. The ROC is informative and useful, but it’s also perhaps overly concise […]

Cohen’s D for Experimental Planning

In this note, we discuss the use of Cohen’s D for planning difference-of-mean experiments. Estimating sample size Let’s imagine you are testing a new weight loss program and comparing it so some existing weight loss regimen. You want to run an experiment to determine if the new program is more […]

On accuracy

In our last article on the algebra of classifier measures we encouraged readers to work through Nina Zumel’s original “Statistics to English Translation” series. This series has become slightly harder to find as we have use the original category designation “statistics to English translation” for additional work. To make things […]

Baking priors

There remains a bit of a two-way snobbery that Frequentist statistics is what we teach (as so-called objective statistics remain the same no matter who works with them) and Bayesian statistics is what we do (as it tends to directly estimate posterior probabilities we are actually interested in). Nina Zumel […]

A Simpler Explanation of Differential Privacy

Differential privacy was originally developed to facilitate secure analysis over sensitive data, with mixed success. It’s back in the news again now, with exciting results from Cynthia Dwork, et. al. (see references at the end of the article) that apply results from differential privacy to machine learning. In this article […]